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Pine, LodgepolePinus contorta v. latifolia

Pine, Lodgepole—Pinus contorta v. latifolia

A handsome native pine with yellowish green to dark green needles, twisted in bundles of two. It has a long, slender, pole-like trunk with a short, narrow, cone shaped crown. The flaky, thin bark is orange brown to grey or black. Cone bearing starts early from 6-10 years of age and the 1 1/2" cones remain mostly unopened and attached on the tree for years. Also known as black pine, it can be quite ornamental when young. It is an important softwood commercial tree and valuable to wildlife. Lodgepole pine does best in full to light shade and adapts to a variety of soil types.

Zones 4 - 8
Zones 4 - 8

Hardiness Zones: Zones 4 - 8
The Lodgepole Pine can be expected to grow in the zones shown in color in the arborday.org zone map. (see map below)

Evergreen
Evergreen

Type of tree:
The Lodgepole Pine falls into the following type(s): Evergreens

70' - 80' High
70' - 80' High

Mature Height:
The Lodgepole Pine grows to be 70' - 80' feet in height.

20' Spread
20' Spread

Mature Spread:
The Lodgepole Pine has a spread of about 20' at full maturity.

Slow to Medium Growth
Slow to Medium Growth

Growth Rate:
This tree grows at a slow to medium growth rate. [More about this.]

Full Sun
Full Sun

Sun:
This pine does well in full sun, partial shade.

Various Soils
Various Soils

Soil:
The Lodgepole Pine grows in acidic, loamy, moist, rich, sandy, silty loam, well drained, wide range, clay soils.

rounded Shape
rounded Shape

Shape:
This pine has rounded shape.

More Info
More Info


The Lodgepole Pine can be expected to grow in the zones shown on this map.

Description:
A handsome native pine with yellowish green to dark green needles, twisted in bundles of two. It has a long, slender, pole-like trunk with a short, narrow, cone shaped crown. The flaky, thin bark is orange brown to grey or black. Cone bearing starts early from 6-10 years of age and the 1 1/2" cones remain mostly unopened and attached on the tree for years. Also known as black pine, it can be quite ornamental when young. It is an important softwood commercial tree and valuable to wildlife. Lodgepole pine does best in full to light shade and adapts to a variety of soil types.