Explore Educational Resources

Ready to integrate some tree-related activities into your classroom this Arbor Day? Try out some of the suggestions below.


  • Science

    • Study the ecosystem of one particular tree.
    • Learn to identify trees in your community. Students can use a tree key or create their own. Take a nature walk and practice this new skill.
    • Study the structure of a tree, how it functions, and what benefits a tree provides.
  • Social Studies

    • Learn about the history of Arbor Day.
    • Study the importance of trees in different cultures.
    • Correlate the history of the United States or your community to one tree's growth rings.
  • Math

    • Learn how to measure a tree's height, crown spread and diameter.
    • Have younger children count the rings on a tree stump.
    • Look for a pattern of numbers in nature.
  • Art

    • Collect leaves, brush tempera paint on them and make leaf prints.
    • Make bark rubbings. Have students trade rubbings to see if they can identify each other's tree.
  • Physical Education

    • Tree shapes often aid in tree identification. Have students pretend to be a certain type of tree—weeping willow, redwood, etc.
  • English

    • Write an Arbor Day poem or rap and perform it for the school.
    • Ask each to student write a description of a tree found on the school grounds. Then see if other students can find it using the description.
    • Have students write letters to community tree planters, thanking them for their efforts.
  • Home Economics

    • Find out about spices and other foods and learn about the trees that produce them.
  • Drama

    • Put on a play about Arbor Day. You can either have the students write their own play or perform Trees: A Joy Forever
  • School-Wide Activities

    • Play Tree Jeopardy or Tree-vial Pursuit and see which class or group of students can answer the most tree-related questions.
    • Plant trees on the school grounds and learn how to maintain them.
    • Participate in a community Arbor Day celebration.
  • Previous Activities

    In past years, educational activities were developed for use in 5th grade classrooms. Please feel free to continue using this great content—and adapting it to meet your needs.