Trees

Hackberry Celtis occidentalis

Tolerant of a wide range of conditions, the Hackberry is a good landscape choice. Grows to a broad crown with arching branches, not unlike the American Elm. Well-suited to urban areas, it withstands wind and city conditions. Grows 40'-70' with a 50' spread. (Zones 3-9)

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Zones 3 - 9
Zones 3 - 9

Hardiness Zones: Zones 3 - 9
The Hackberry can be expected to grow in the zones shown in color in the arborday.org zone map. VIEW MAP

Ornamental Tree
Ornamental Tree

Type of tree:
The Hackberry falls into the following type(s): Ornamental Trees, Shade Trees

40' - 60' High
40' - 60' High

Mature Height:
The Hackberry grows to be 40' - 60' feet in height.

40' - 60' Spread
40' - 60' Spread

Mature Spread:
The Hackberry has a spread of about 40' - 60' at full maturity.

Medium to Fast Growth
Medium to Fast Growth

Growth Rate:
This tree grows at a medium to fast growth rate. [More about this.]

Full Sun
Full Sun

Sun:
This Hackberry does well in full sun.

Various Soils
Various Soils

Soil:
The Hackberry grows in acidic, alkaline, drought tolerant, loamy, moist, rich, sandy, well drained, wet, wide range, clay soils.

Rounded Shape
Rounded Shape

Shape:
This Hackberry has rounded, vase shape.

More Info
More Info

Attributes:
The Hackberry has been called admiringly, "one tough tree!" Found on a wide range of soils east of the Rockies from southern Canada to Florida, Hackberries thrive in a wide range of temperatures and on sites that vary from 14 to 60 inches of annual rainfall. Here is a tree that can stand up to strong winds, tolerate air pollution, and bring shade to hot city streets.

Description:
Tolerant of a wide range of conditions, the Hackberry is a good landscape choice. Grows to a broad crown with arching branches, not unlike the American Elm. Well-suited to urban areas, it withstands wind and city conditions. Grows 40'-70' with a 50' spread. (Zones 3-9)

Wildlife Value:
The fruit of the Hackberry is popular with winter birds, especially the cedar waxwing, mockingbird, and robin.

History/Lore/Use:
In earlier years, its tough, flexible wood was used for barrel hoops and many a pioneer cabin was equipped with durable Hackberry wood flooring. The tree was first cultivated in 1636.

Moisture:
Has some tolerance for both flooding and drought.

Leaves:
Shaped like spearheads, approximately 2 to 4 inches long and 1-1/2 to 2 inches wide, arranged alternately along the twigs. Small teeth edge at least the upper half of the leaf.

Flower Color:
Green color, faded, not noteworthy

Bloom Time:
April-May.

Fruit Description:
The Hackberry produces a small, dark-red berries that turn purple as they mature. The berry is less than 1/2 inch in diameter and is borne on slender stems about 1/2 to 3/4 inches long. Inside is a pit, that when scraped clean, reveals an interesting net-like pattern. The fruit is attractive to wildlife.