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Dogwood, PinkCornus florida 'Rubra'

Dogwood, Pink—Cornus florida 'Rubra'

Biscuit-shaped flowers grace this low-branching tree. Berries are glossy, red and attractive to birds. In winter, gray stems and checkered bark contrast with snow. Prefers partial shade; acid, moist, well-drained soil. Grows to 25', 25' spread. (zones 5-9)

Zones 5 - 9
Zones 5 - 9

Hardiness Zones: Zones 5 - 9
The Pink Dogwood can be expected to grow in the zones shown in color in the arborday.org zone map. (see map below)

Flowering Tree
Flowering Tree

Type of tree:
The Pink Dogwood falls into the following type(s): Flowering Trees, Ornamental Trees

25' High
25' High

Mature Height:
The Pink Dogwood grows to be 25' feet in height.

25' Spread
25' Spread

Mature Spread:
The Pink Dogwood has a spread of about 25' at full maturity.

Medium Growth
Medium Growth

Growth Rate:
This tree grows at a medium growth rate. [More about this.]

Full Sun
Full Sun

Sun:
This dogwood does well in full sun, partial shade.

Various Soils
Various Soils

Soil:
The Pink Dogwood grows in acidic, loamy, moist, rich, sandy, well drained, clay soils.

Rounded Shape
Rounded Shape

Shape:
This dogwood has rounded shape.

More Info
More Info


The Pink Dogwood can be expected to grow in the zones shown on this map.

Attributes:
This is a good tree for planting near utility lines, next to buildings, or near patios. It is also an excellent contrast tree for larger evergreen backgrounds. The fruit is a favorite of songbirds.

Description:
Biscuit-shaped flowers grace this low-branching tree. Berries are glossy, red and attractive to birds. In winter, gray stems and checkered bark contrast with snow. Prefers partial shade; acid, moist, well-drained soil. Grows to 25', 25' spread. (zones 5-9)

Wildlife Value:
The Pink Dogwood is an important source of food for many small birds and mammals including robins, cardinals, and waxwings. Fruits persist through winter.

History/Lore/Use:
A variety of the flowering Dogwood, this tree was first noticed and recorded by plant hunter Marc Catesby in 1731. The tree was soon cultivated and remains highly popular today.

Moisture:
Moist, well-drained soil

Leaves:
The leaves of this tree are opposite, oval or ovate, 3-6" long, dark green.

Flower Color:
Pink flowers

Bloom Time:
April-May.

Fruit Description:
This tree produces glossy, red fruit eaten by birds when ripened in the fall.