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Magnolia, CucumbertreeMagnolia acuminata

Magnolia, Cucumbertree—Magnolia acuminata

Perfect, slightly fragrant greenish-yellow flowers bloom high upon the tree in May to early June with pinkish red fruit resembling a cucumber. Exceptional tree for large properties. Medium to fast growth rate. Grows 50' to 80', 40' spread. (zones 4-8)

Zones 4 - 8
Zones 4 - 8

Hardiness Zones: Zones 4 - 8
The Cucumbertree Magnolia can be expected to grow in the zones shown in color in the arborday.org zone map. (see map below)

Flowering Tree
Flowering Tree

Type of tree:
The Cucumbertree Magnolia falls into the following type(s): Flowering Trees

50' - 80' High
50' - 80' High

Mature Height:
The Cucumbertree Magnolia grows to be 50' - 80' feet in height.

40' Spread
40' Spread

Mature Spread:
The Cucumbertree Magnolia has a spread of about 40' at full maturity.

Medium to Fast Growth
Medium to Fast Growth

Growth Rate:
This tree grows at a medium to fast growth rate. [More about this.]

Full Sun
Full Sun

Sun:
This magnolia does well in full sun.

Various Soils
Various Soils

Soil:
The Cucumbertree Magnolia grows in acidic, loamy, moist, sandy, well drained, wet, clay soils.

Pyramidal Shape
Pyramidal Shape

Shape:
This magnolia has pyramidal, upright or erect shape.

More Info
More Info


The Cucumbertree Magnolia can be expected to grow in the zones shown on this map.

Attributes:
An excellent shade tree for large expanses that grows rapidly.

Description:
Perfect, slightly fragrant greenish-yellow flowers bloom high upon the tree in May to early June with pinkish red fruit resembling a cucumber. Exceptional tree for large properties. Medium to fast growth rate. Grows 50' to 80', 40' spread. (zones 4-8)

Wildlife Value:
The seeds of the Cucumbertree Magnolia are eaten by several species of birds and small mammals. Grackles and blackbirds will eat the young fruit. Twigs, leaves, and buds are sometimes browsed by deer.

History/Lore/Use:
The Cucumber Magnolia Tree is found in forests from New York to Georgia and west to Illinois. The first scientific observations were made in 1736 by John Clayton, one of Virginia's pioneer botanists. In the early 1800s these trees were widely exported to Europe, where they were found in the very finest gardens and landscapes. The pioneers were reputed to have used the bitters extracted from the green fruit with whisky as a fever medicine. The wood was also widely used for furniture and interior paneling.

Moisture:
Can withstand some flooding and has moderate drought tolerance.

Leaves:
The leaves from this tree alternate, and are simple, elliptic, 4 to 10 inches long. Yellow-green in summer, sometimes bronze in the fall.

Flower Color:
Yellow-green flowers that have a tendency to blend in with the leaves.

Bloom Time:
May to early June..

Fruit Description:
The fruit is pinkish red fruit resembling a cucumber from which the tree derives it's name. Attractive to wildlife and leaves little or no residue on the ground.