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Maple, SugarAcer saccharum

Maple, Sugar—Acer saccharum

The Sugar Maple is a landscape standout. Medium to dark-green leaves turn yellow, burnt orange or red in fall. Tolerates shade, likes a well-drained, moderately moist, fertile soil. Do not plant in confined areas or where salt is a problem. Grows to 60' to 75', 40'-50' spread. (zones 3-8)

Zones 3 - 8
Zones 3 - 8

Hardiness Zones: Zones 3 - 8
The Sugar Maple can be expected to grow in the zones shown in color in the arborday.org zone map. (see map below)

Ornamental Tree
Ornamental Tree

Type of tree:
The Sugar Maple falls into the following type(s): Ornamental Trees, Shade Trees

60' - 75' High
60' - 75' High

Mature Height:
The Sugar Maple grows to be 60' - 75' feet in height.

40' - 50' Spread
40' - 50' Spread

Mature Spread:
The Sugar Maple has a spread of about 40' - 50' at full maturity.

Slow to Medium Growth
Slow to Medium Growth

Growth Rate:
This tree grows at a slow to medium growth rate. [More about this.]

Full Sun
Full Sun

Sun:
This maple does well in full sun, partial shade.

Various Soils
Various Soils

Soil:
Deep, well drained, acidic to slightly alkaline soil

Oval Shape
Oval Shape

Shape:
This maple has oval, rounded shape.

More Info
More Info


The Sugar Maple can be expected to grow in the zones shown on this map.

Attributes:
The Sugar Maple tree is one of America's most loved trees. Here is a tree that lives to serve! Perhaps it is best known for its syrup, or Syrop as the French explorers called it when they found Native Americans enjoying this spring delight. Today, about two million gallons of the liquid gold support an important rural industry in the United States. Its gifts include shade and fall beauty that are unparalleled in park and home landscapes. Finally, as one last service during its sojourn on earth, Sugar Maple as firewood has few rivals - it splits easily, gives off an enormous amount of heat, produces few sparks, and ends in fine, rich ashes that pioneers turned into soap but today can enrich gardens.

Description:
The Sugar Maple is a landscape standout. Medium to dark-green leaves turn yellow, burnt orange or red in fall. Tolerates shade, likes a well-drained, moderately moist, fertile soil. Do not plant in confined areas or where salt is a problem. Grows to 60' to 75', 40'-50' spread. (zones 3-8)

Wildlife Value:
Sugar Maples are commonly browsed by white-tailed deer, moose, and snowshoe hare. Squirrels feed on the seeds, buds, twigs, and leaves.

History/Lore/Use:
The wood of the Sugar Maple tree has always been highly valued for furniture because of its beauty, and for products ranging from flooring to bowling pins thanks to its extreme hardness. During the 2001 baseball season, Barry Bonds switched from the traditional Ash wood baseball bat to one made of Maple and hit 73 home runs, a new record! In 1663, chemist Robert Boyle informed the Europeans about the tree in the new world that produced a sweet substance and John Smith was among the first settlers who remarked about the Native American's sugar processing and the fact that they used the product for barter. It has been used for medicine because of its bone-building phosphates that enhance calcium retention.

Moisture:
Prefers moist soil conditions but has moderate drought resistance.

Leaves:
This trees leaves are 3 to 5 inches across with 5, or rarely 3, distinctive lobes. Autumn coloration is a striking red and yellow.

Flower Color:
Green-yellow.

Bloom Time:
April-May.

Fruit Description:
This tree produces two winged seeds on a single stem, each approximately 1-1/4 to 1-1/2 inches long.