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Pine, LoblollyPinus taeda

Pine, Loblolly—Pinus taeda

One of the fastest growing southern pines, this tree is used as a quick-screen in many landscapes. This North American native has dark green needles and narrow, red-brown, often-paired cones that are three to six inches long. Grows in a wide variety of soils and is drought tolerant. 60'-100' height with 25-35' spread. (Zones 6-9)

Zones 6 - 9
Zones 6 - 9

Hardiness Zones: Zones 6 - 9
The Loblolly Pine can be expected to grow in the zones shown in color in the arborday.org zone map. (see map below)

Evergreen
Evergreen

Type of tree:
The Loblolly Pine falls into the following type(s): Evergreens

60' - 90' High
60' - 90' High

Mature Height:
The Loblolly Pine grows to be 60' - 90' feet in height.

25' - 35' Spread
25' - 35' Spread

Mature Spread:
The Loblolly Pine has a spread of about 25' - 35' at full maturity.

Fast Growth
Fast Growth

Growth Rate:
This tree grows at a fast growth rate. [More about this.]

Full Sun
Full Sun

Sun:
This pine does well in full sun.

Various Soils
Various Soils

Soil:
The Loblolly Pine grows in acidic, drought tolerant, loamy, moist, sandy, well drained, clay soils.

Oval Shape
Oval Shape

Shape:
This pine has oval shape.

More Info
More Info


The Loblolly Pine can be expected to grow in the zones shown on this map.

Attributes:
The Loblolly Pine tree is one of the fastest growing evergreen trees with a long life that makes an excellent wind screen. It loses its lower branches with age so it can also be used as a shade tree. The Loblolly Pine tree is very easy to transplant and adapts well to moist soil conditions such as those found near rivers and streams.

Description:
One of the fastest growing southern pines, this tree is used as a quick-screen in many landscapes. This North American native has dark green needles and narrow, red-brown, often-paired cones that are three to six inches long. Grows in a wide variety of soils and is drought tolerant. 60'-100' height with 25-35' spread. (Zones 6-9)

Wildlife Value:
Loblolly pines provide shelter and food for many southeastern animals, including birds such as Carolina chickadees, brown-headed nuthatches, rufous-sided towhees, northern bobwhites and wild turkeys. The seeds are also consumed by chipmunks, squirrels and other small rodents.

History/Lore/Use:
The Loblolly is native to the east coast of North America from New Jersey to Florida and Texas. As such, it has a long history with the pioneers and is known by several other names, among them Rosemary, Old Field, Bull, Indian and Longstraw. In the South, the name Loblolly means a depression, and as the tree was originally observed growing in river bottoms, that is where it acquired its principal name. It has a tendency to take over abandoned areas, thus the name Old-Field; it is extremely aromatic, which is where "Rosemary" came from; and it is blessed with extremely large trunks, suggesting the name "Bull." It was once an important lumber tree due to its abundance.

Moisture:
Normal moisture required; some flooding with moderate drought tolerance.

Leaves:
The leaves of this tree spiral; three needles, 6 to 9 inches long.

Flower Color:
Yellow; nondescript.

Bloom Time:
April-May.

Fruit Description:
The fruit is oval; 3 to 6 inches long; dry; brown; attracts mammals.