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Honeylocust, Thornless Gleditsia triacanthos inermis

Honeylocust, Thornless - Gleditsia triacanthos inermis
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A fast-growing tree with fragrant spring flowers. Its delicate, open silhouette lets grass grow underneath. Tiny leaflets turn yellow or yellow-green in fall. Pollution, salt and drought tolerant. Adapts to a wide range of soils. Prefers full sun. Grows to 30' to 70', 50' spread. (zones 3-9)

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Zones 3 - 9 Zones 3 - 9
Hardiness Zones 3 - 9
The Thornless Honeylocust can be expected to grow in the zones shown in color in the arborday.org zone map. View Map
Shade Tree Shade Tree
Type of tree
Shade Trees
30' - 70' High 30' - 70' High
Mature Height
The Thornless Honeylocust grows to be 30' - 70' feet in height.
30' - 70' Spread 30' - 70' Spread
Mature Spread
The Thornless Honeylocust has a spread of about 30' - 70' at full maturity.
Fast Growth Fast Growth
Growth Rate
This tree grows at a fast growth rate. More about this.
Full Sun Full Sun
Sun
This honeylocust does well in full sun.
Various Soils Various Soils
Soil

Tolerant of a wide range of soils including acid, alkaline, moist, dry, salt.

Oval Shape Oval Shape
Shape
This honeylocust has oval, rounded shape.
Attributes

The Thornless Honeylocust is a widely planted landscape tree. Its tolerance to the stresses of urban conditions partially accounts for its popularity, especially its ability to withstand drought and to grow under a wide range of soil conditions. It is also said to be one of the most salt-tolerant trees, standing up well even along Chicago's freeways. Another feature is its remarkable growth rate. Newly planted trees can be expected to add 2 feet or more per season for at least the first 10 years. Finally, the open crown of the Honeylocust allows enough light to filter through to favor the growth of grass beneath its branches.

Description

A fast-growing tree with fragrant spring flowers. Its delicate, open silhouette lets grass grow underneath. Tiny leaflets turn yellow or yellow-green in fall. Pollution, salt and drought tolerant. Adapts to a wide range of soils. Prefers full sun. Grows to 30' to 70', 50' spread. (zones 3-9)

Wildlife Value

Thornless honeylocust seed pods and seeds are consumed by livestock and wildlife such as rabbits, deer, squirrels and northern bobwhite. The flowers provide a good source for bee food.

History/Lore/Use

The Thornless Honeylocust is native from Pennsylvania to Nebraska and south to Texas. The first scientific observations of this species were made in 1700. Sometimes still referred to in the South as the Confederate Pintree because its thorns were used to pin uniforms together during the Civil War, the tree derives the name "Honey" from the sweet, honey-like substance found in its pods. The Cherokees in Tennessee made bows from the tree's durable and strong wood.

Moisture

The tree has moderate flooding and drought tolerance.

Leaves

The leaves of this tree are pinnate or bipinnate, which means each leaf branches once or twice. Bearing 8-14 leaflets on each section.

Flower Color

Yellow color, pleasant fragrance.

Bloom Time

May-June

Fruit Description

This tree produces large brown pods resembling twisted leather straps can reach 8 inches in length.