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Boxwood (Common) Buxus sempervirens

Common Boxwood - Buxus sempervirens
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Bluish gray-green foliage turning radiant dark-green with maturity enhance this very popular evergreen. Rounded to broad-rounded shape reaching 15'-20' in height with an equal spread. An outstanding choice for hedges, massing, or formal gardens. An excellent shrub for shearing. Adaptable to many soil types.

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Zones 5 - 8 Zones 5 - 8
Hardiness Zones 5 - 8
The Boxwood (Common) can be expected to grow in the zones shown in color in the arborday.org zone map. View Map
Evergreen Evergreen
Type of tree
Evergreens, Evergreen Shrubs, Shrubs
15' - 20' High 15' - 20' High
Mature Height
The Boxwood (Common) grows to be 15' - 20' feet in height.
15' - 20' Spread 15' - 20' Spread
Mature Spread
The Boxwood (Common) has a spread of about 15' - 20' at full maturity.
Slow Growth Slow Growth
Growth Rate
This tree grows at a slow growth rate. More about this.
Full Sun Full Sun
Sun
This Boxwood (Common) does well in full sun, partial shade.
Various Soils Various Soils
Soil
The Boxwood (Common) grows in acidic, alkaline, loamy, moist, rich, sandy, silty loam, well drained, wide range soils.
Rounded Shape Rounded Shape
Shape
This Boxwood (Common) has rounded shape.
Attributes

Dense, multi-branched evergreen shrub. Grows to 15' to 20' in height with an equal or greater spread; actually can make a handsome small tree. Excellent specimen and is used extensively in East and South; good for hedges, massing, topiary work, formal gardens; might be called the "aristocrat" of the hedging plants.

Description

Bluish gray-green foliage turning radiant dark-green with maturity enhance this very popular evergreen. Rounded to broad-rounded shape reaching 15'-20' in height with an equal spread. An outstanding choice for hedges, massing, or formal gardens. An excellent shrub for shearing. Adaptable to many soil types.

History/Lore/Use

Boxwood through the years has been associated with formal gardens. Boxwood parterres and hedges can be seen in many of the great gardens of Europe and America. Colonial Williamsburg, especially around the Governor's Mansion, offers wonderful examples of formal boxwood use.

Leaves

Dark green above, light or yellowish green underneath; usually lustrous on both sides.