Trees

Hawthorn, Washington Crataegus phaenopyrum

Washington Hawthorn—Crataegus phaenopyrum

White flowers in early June start the color show. Reddish-purple leaves turn dark green, then orange, scarlet or purple. Small, glossy red fruits stay on tree into winter, and are preferred by songbirds. Grows to 25' to 30', 25' spread. (zones 4-8)

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Zones 4 - 8
Zones 4 - 8

Hardiness Zones: Zones 4 - 8
The Washington Hawthorn can be expected to grow in the zones shown in color in the arborday.org zone map. VIEW MAP

Flowering Tree
Flowering Tree

Type of tree:
The Washington Hawthorn falls into the following type(s): Flowering Trees, Ornamental Trees

25' - 30' High
25' - 30' High

Mature Height:
The Washington Hawthorn grows to be 25' - 30' feet in height.

25' Spread
25' Spread

Mature Spread:
The Washington Hawthorn has a spread of about 25' at full maturity.

Medium Growth
Medium Growth

Growth Rate:
This tree grows at a medium growth rate. [More about this.]

Full Sun
Full Sun

Sun:
This hawthorn does well in full sun.

Various Soils
Various Soils

Soil:
The Washington Hawthorn grows in acidic, alkaline, drought tolerant, loamy, moist, sandy, well drained, wet, wide range, clay soils.

Pyramidal Shape
Pyramidal Shape

Shape:
This hawthorn has pyramidal shape.

More Info
More Info

Attributes:
The Washington Hawthorn is a small, colorful tree that will brighten any landscape. Its pleasant display begins with reddish-purple leaves emerging in spring, then turning dark green as they are joined by a graceful display of white flowers. In autumn, the leaves turn orange, scarlet or purple. Red berries extend the colorful show into winter, often contrasting beautifully with the first winter snow. If left unpruned, its thorns make a very effective barrier.

Description:
White flowers in early June start the color show. Reddish-purple leaves turn dark green, then orange, scarlet or purple. Small, glossy red fruits stay on tree into winter, and are preferred by songbirds. Grows to 25' to 30', 25' spread. (zones 4-8)

Wildlife Value:
The Washington Hawthorn produces abundant fruit which are eaten by birds & mammals. It is an important nectar plant for bees.

History/Lore/Use:
First noted scientifically in 1883, the tree received its name from its point of origin when introduced to Pennsylvania from Washington, becoming known as the "Washington Thorn" because of its prominent thorns.

Moisture:
Drought resistant.

Leaves:
This tree's leaves are reddish-purple, changing to dark green, then orange, scarlet or purple.

Flower Color:
Showy white flowers

Bloom Time:
Late May to early June.

Fruit Description:
This tree produces a bright red fruit 1/4" in diameter. Very attractive to birds, with little or no litter as a result.