Trees

Oak, Pin Quercus palustris

Pyramidal through early maturity, its form turns more oval in older age. Fast-growing, tolerates wet soils, likes full sun. Glossy dark green leaves turn russet, bronze or red. Grows to 60' to 70', 25-45' spread. (zones 4-8)

Try this tree in your yard:

Get Pricing Info

click icons for more information.  Show All | Hide All

Zones 4 - 8
Zones 4 - 8

Hardiness Zones: Zones 4 - 8
The Pin Oak can be expected to grow in the zones shown in color in the arborday.org zone map. VIEW MAP

Shade Tree
Shade Tree

Type of tree:
The Pin Oak falls into the following type(s): Shade Trees

60' - 70' High
60' - 70' High

Mature Height:
The Pin Oak grows to be 60' - 70' feet in height.

25' - 40' Spread
25' - 40' Spread

Mature Spread:
The Pin Oak has a spread of about 25' - 40' at full maturity.

Fast Growth
Fast Growth

Growth Rate:
This tree grows at a fast growth rate. [More about this.]

Full Sun
Full Sun

Sun:
This oak does well in full sun.

Various Soils
Various Soils

Soil:
The Pin Oak grows in acidic, loamy, moist, rich, sandy, well drained, wet, clay soils.

Pyramidal Shape
Pyramidal Shape

Shape:
This oak has pyramidal shape.

More Info
More Info

Attributes:
The Pin Oak is a very distinctive tree because of its unusual branching habit. Upper branches are upright, middle ones horizontal and its lower limbs slant gracefully towards earth. Widely used as a street and landscape tree.

Description:
Pyramidal through early maturity, its form turns more oval in older age. Fast-growing, tolerates wet soils, likes full sun. Glossy dark green leaves turn russet, bronze or red. Grows to 60' to 70', 25'-45' spread. (zones 4-8)

Wildlife Value:
Pin oak acorns are eaten by wild turkeys, whitetail deer, squirrels and smaller rodents, but are a particularly important food for many ducks.

History/Lore/Use:
The name Pin Oak comes from its short, tough branchlets that are located along the branches and limbs. Its native habitat is the moist bottomlands of the central Midwest and middle Atlantic states. First observed scientifically prior to 1770.

Moisture:
Tolerates wet conditions including moderate flooding

Leaves:
This trees leaves have deep sinuses that extend 2/3 or more to the midrib separating 5 (sometimes 7 to 9) lobes. Medium green in summer with copper or red autumn color.

Flower Color:
Brown, faded flower color. Not noteworthy.

Bloom Time:
April-May.

Fruit Description:
Fruit is round, 1/2 inch long, nearly round with a thin, saucer-like cup of small, tight scales.