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Poplar, Hybrid Populus deltoides x Populus nigra

Hybrid Poplar - Populus deltoides x Populus nigra
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A very fast-growing tree, up to 5 to 8 feet per year. Has silvery-green leaves and broad shade-tree shape. Usually planted for very fast shade, or can be harvested for firewood in 5 to 7 years. This is a cottonless hybrid. Plant back from sidewalks. Grows to 40' to 50', 30' spread. (zones 3-9)

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Zones 3 - 9 Zones 3 - 9
Hardiness Zones 3 - 9
The Hybrid Poplar can be expected to grow in the zones shown in color in the arborday.org zone map. View Map
Shade Tree Shade Tree
Type of tree
Shade Trees
40' - 50' High 40' - 50' High
Mature Height
The Hybrid Poplar grows to be 40' - 50' feet in height.
30' Spread 30' Spread
Mature Spread
The Hybrid Poplar has a spread of about 30' at full maturity.
Fast Growth Fast Growth
Growth Rate
This tree grows at a fast growth rate. More about this.
Full Sun Full Sun
Sun
This poplar does well in full sun.
Various Soils Various Soils
Soil
The Hybrid Poplar grows in acidic, alkaline, wet soils.
Oval Shape Oval Shape
Shape
This poplar has oval shape.
Attributes

Hybrid Poplars are the thoroughbreds of the tree world. Their claim to fame is speed. Growth of 5 to 8 feet per year is not uncommon, which makes this tree a good choice for quick shade on a vacant lot or for suburban firewood groves.

Description

A very fast-growing tree, up to 5 to 8 feet per year. Has silvery-green leaves and broad shade-tree shape. Usually planted for very fast shade, or can be harvested for firewood in 5 to 7 years. This is a cottonless hybrid. Plant back from sidewalks. Grows to 40' to 50', 30' spread. (zones 3-9)

Wildlife Value

Hybrid Poplar bark, twigs, and leaves eaten by rodents, rabbits, deer, beaver, and porcupines. It provides forage for browsing wildlife such as whitetail and mule deer up through the sapling stage. It also provides important nesting and roosting habitat for various species of birds.

History/Lore/Use

There are many crosses that go by the name Hybrid Poplar, but this one between Eastern Cottonwood from the United States and Black Poplar from Europe and North Africa has been a favorite for a very long time. Botanists and Hobbyists in colonial times are said to have exchanged the parent trees across the ocean, with both natural and artificial hybrids soon resulting. The oldest account of the tree was given by a scientist in 1785.

Moisture

Wet soil preferred.

Leaves

The leaves are triangular, 3-6 inches long and 4-5 inches wide, with "teeth" all around the margin. Often silver-green in color, but this is quite variable. Stalks are frequently reddish.