Replanting our Nation’s Forests

Sequoia National Forest

Replanting Our Nation’s Forests

Sequoia National Forest
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Forest Overview

Located in central California, northeast of Bakersfield and east of Fresno, the Sequoia National Forest is one of the most famous and popular national forests—possibly because it is named after the world’s largest tree, the giant sequoia. The forest encompasses 38 groves of giant sequoia within its 864,991 acres. Majestic granite monoliths, glacier-torn canyons, roaring whitewater, and lush meadows characterize the landscape.

The Sequoia National Forest contains a large number of unique ecological communities not found elsewhere.

Sequoia National Forest Needs Our Help

Planting 110,000 Jeffrey pine, sugar pine, and white fir trees will re-introduce these important native conifers where no viable seed source remains. The Sequoia National Forest contains a large number of unique ecological communities not found elsewhere. Included in these unique communities are many wildlife species dependent on mature forest habitat, including pacific fisher, spotted owls, and goshawk. Watershed restoration and protection is a major reason for establishing these areas to a forested condition after the Piute Fire. These new trees are critical for habitat protection, watershed protection and management, and to serve people with abundant recreation opportunities for decades to come.

Help Today!

You can help repair damage to wildlife habitats. Read about our efforts in each and restore the awe-inspiring beauty of our state and national forests.