Replanting our Nation’s Forests

Tillamook State Forest

Replanting Our Nation’s Forests

Forest Overview

The Tillamook State Forest was established as a result of large wildfires in the 1930’s and 1940’s and the subsequent large-scale reforestation efforts that followed. More than 70 million trees were planted by volunteers and schoolchildren in response to the Tillamook burns. Due to these efforts, a diverse and sustainable forest is now a place of recreation and enjoyment. This gem in northwest Oregon is an hour’s drive west of Portland, and is home to 364,000 acres of beauty and wonder.

Tillamook State Forest Needs Our Help

Insect and disease outbreaks play a large role in the forest health. Much of the Tillamook State Forest is dominated by young Douglasfir trees which are susceptible to laminated root rot (Phellinus weirii). This disease is abnormally high in the forest due to the large number of Douglasfir trees, resulting in significant tree mortality in recent years.


The Oregon Department of Forestry has an urgent need to diversify the tree canopy by planting more than 60,000 red alder, western red cedar, and western hemlock trees. The goal is to improve long term watershed health and to provide diverse habitats for the many wildlife species that call this place home. With your assistance, efforts can become a reality by spring, 2011.

Help Today!

You can help repair damage to wildlife habitats. Read about our efforts in each and restore the awe-inspiring beauty of our state and national forests.