Current Restoration Projects

Bastrop State Park | Ontario (Trees Ontario) | British Columbia (Trees Ontario) | Flight 93 Memorial | United Kingdom (Woodland Trust) | Manitoba (Tree Canada) | Pike National Forest | Gallatin National Forest | Seminole State Forest | Modoc National Forest | Huron-Manistee National Forest | Germany (Schutzgemeinschaft Deutscher Wald)

Bastrop State Park

Bastrop State Park

Forest Overview

250,000 trees

On September 4, 2011, three separate wildfires in and around Bastrop, Texas, eventually merged into one fire -- the Bastrop County Complex Fire. The fire quickly spread across the drought-ridden region, inflicting significant scars on the landscape of central Texas. By October 29, when the fire was finally declared extinguished, 95% of Bastrop State Park and 32,400 acres of the Lost Pines Forest ecosystem were burned.

The Lost Pines Forest Recovery Campaign is a multiyear public-private partnership between the Arbor Day Foundation, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and Texas A & M Forest Service. The overall 2014 goal for the Bastrop County project is one million trees planted – and together we are making a substantial positive impact in helping to mitigate the environmental devastation caused by the wildfire.

The newly planted Loblolly Pine trees will serve a critical role in helping to restore the pine tree forest and critical wildlife habitat lost in these devastating wildfires. The Lost Pines Forest Recoverye trees on public and private lands in Bastrop, Texas during a 5 year period. 2014 marks the second year of Enterprise’s partnership with Bastrop State Park in central Texas. This renewed commitment will bring our combined total to half a million trees planted. Enterprise has played -- and can continue to play -- a vital role in helping Bastrop State Park and Texas A & M Forest Service make significant progress toward reaching the goal of Lost Pines Forest ecosystem restoration. The robust scale of our project partnerships help to ensure that the unique Lost Pines Forest of Bastrop County will rise from the ashes and continue to thrive for generations to come.

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Ontario (Trees Ontario)

Ontario (Trees Ontario)

Forest Overview

8,220 trees

There is an urgent need for forest restoration in specific areas of southwestern Ontario, in particular Essex County, the Ausable Bayfield watershed (parts of Huron and Middlesex counties), and the Upper Thames River Valley watershed (parts of Middlesex, Perth and Oxford counties). Experts have determined that a healthy and sustainable ecosystem requires a minimum of 30% forest cover. Because of past land clearing for agricultural and urbanization purposes, forest cover in the areas of the proposed plantings now ranges from a mere 5.7% to 12%.

Essex County falls within the Carolinian Canada zone, which is a stretch of southwestern Ontario that is among North America’s most vibrant and fragile regions, home to rare, endangered, and at risk species than any other life zone in Canada. The crisis facing this region is the fact that their forest cover is only 5.7%, second lowest in all of Ontario. Existing forests are highly fragmented and degraded. The loss of more than one million trees to the Emerald Ash Borer has also significantly impacted this region’s forest cover, reducing both air and water quality.

In the Upper Thames River watershed, forest cover is approximately 12% with ongoing forest fragmentation, species loss and the need for source water protection being critical issues. Forest restoration efforts on three sites in this area would have a positive impact on water quality and wildlife habitat.

The species to be planted are primarily native hardwood consisting of, but not limited to: black cherry, American Beech, red Oak, sugar maple, bitternut hickory, bur Oak, white Oak, black walnut, American Sycamore and tuliptree. A lesser component of conifers, including eastern red cedar, Norway spruce, eastern white pine and white spruce will be established as well.

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British Columbia (Trees Ontario)

British Columbia (Trees Ontario)

Forest Overview

3,000 trees

A need exists for restoration efforts in specific areas of the University of British Columbia (UBC) Malcolm Knapp Research Forest. UBC’s forests are maintained by the university’s Faculty of Forestry. Dedicated in 1949, this 5,000-hectare research forest supports skill development and training for future foresters. The forest is managed as a non-profit entity– all funds raised from commercial operations directly support research and education within the forest. Because of the important criteria to be adhered to as a research and training forest, UBC is increasingly concerned as key areas of the forest are now in great need of restoration.

Efforts at the research forest will include site restoration and re-planting to both create new silvicultural teaching sites and to restore other critical sites to further UBC’s research and education mandate. The forest is near Maple Ridge, British Columbia, a district municipality located in the northeastern section of metro Vancouver between the Fraser River and Golden Ears Mountain, and is part of the Coast Mountain Range. In the proposed planting areas, forest cover has been highly degraded. Now is the ideal opportunity to restore the forest to critical native, site-suitable species.

The native tree species that will be planted include, but are not limited to, Sitka spruce, western red cedar, Douglasfir, western white pine and black cottonwood.

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Flight 93 Memorial

Flight 93 Memorial

Forest Overview

39,000 trees

The Flight 93 National Memorial is a spectacularly moving, newly dedicated 2,200 acre National Park in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. This hallowed land is a permanent and lasting tribute to the forty men and women who lost their lives in order to save the lives of many others on September 11, 2001.

This powerful public memorial to the men and women of Flight 93 — and the bravery and courage they displayed — is located on reclaimed coal mining land. Though historically forested, the reclaimed land now consists of compacted soils and thin tree stands due to the many years of intensive coal extraction. To ensure a successful planting, many of our partners are joining together to lend their guidance and unique expertise. Some of our partners include the Office of Surface Mining (Department of Interior), Pennsylvania Department and Bureau of Forestry, the Appalachian Regional Reforestation Initiative, Green Forest Works, and the American Chestnut Foundation.

Our friends with the National Park Foundation are proud to continue our partnership in 2014 to plant trees at the Flight 93 National Memorial. Spring 2014 — our second year working on this important project — will feature a public volunteer-led reforestation event at the Flight 93 National Memorial, providing an excellent opportunity and venue for Enterprise volunteers to help plant trees and experience the awe of the Flight 93 National Memorial. In total, Enterprise will have helped contribute to the planting of 69,000 trees at this living memorial which is visited and uniquely, individually experienced by hundreds of thousands of people each and every year.

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United Kingdom (Woodland Trust)

United Kingdom (Woodland Trust)

Forest Overview

100,000 trees

Despite the importance of trees and the widespread recognition of the benefits they provide, the United Kingdom (UK) is one of the least wooded countries in Europe with only 13% woodland cover compared with the European average of 44%. To help increase the amount of native tree cover, we propose continuing the partnership between Enterprise and the Woodland Trust. Through this partnership, we are planning to create new forestland on Ministry of Defense sites.

Now in our third year, the partnership continues to provide for the creation of new forestland on Ministry of Defense sites, all of which offer enormous benefits for nature, wildlife, and the environment.

These projects have also provided excellent opportunities for Enterprise employee volunteer engagement. Enterprise has and is already making a critical contribution to growing the forest canopy in the UK, and can continue to help meet the existing identified reforestation needs, as Woodland Trust is proposing to plant another 100,000 trees in the UK in 2014. During several years and multiple partnerships in the UK, Enterprise has helped to plant 435,800 total trees since 2006. With the continued efforts of Woodland Trust and Enterprise in 2014, we will exceed half a million trees planted.

Approved Planting Sites For 2014:
  • Condor, Angus, Scotland — 39.2 ha to be planted Qtr 1 2014
  • Barry Buddon, Angus, Scotland — 16.2 ha to be planted Qtr 1 2014
  • Pentlands, Edinburgh & Lothians, Scotland — 42.8 ha to be planted Qtr 4 2014 and Qtr 1 2015
  • Magilligan, Northern Ireland — 30 ha to be planted Qtr 4 2014
  • Catterick, North Yorkshire — 40 ha to be planted Qtr 4 2014

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Manitoba (Tree Canada)

Manitoba (Tree Canada)

Forest Overview

38,780 trees

Our friends and partners at Tree Canada will facilitate the planting of 38,780 White Spruce (Manitoba's provincial tree) conifer trees in the fall of 2014 on First Nation land. The planting area is located within the Swan Lake First Nation Indian Reserve 7A in south-central Manitoba near the community of Carberry.

This 512 hectare parcel of First Nation land is presently exhibits hay, meadow and sparse tree cover. Many fragmented open areas interspersed among aspen and spruce are in need of additional tree cover and critical habitat restoration. The 38,780 White Spruce containergrown seedlings will originate at the local Pineland Forest Nursery in Manitoba. The seedlings are from local zone seed sources and will be boxed and shipped to the planting site.

White Spruce trees will provide many benefits including snow retention, shelter from winds, and noise/dust reduction from vehicle traffic from a recently constructed casino and hotel located along PTH 5. Trees planted away from the highway will provide shade and increase recreational opportunities for First Nation residents. Additional benefits include habitat and food for wildlife, wildlife corridor restoration, enhanced aesthetic beauty, critical watershed protection, important carbon sequestration, and cleaner air and water for all Manitobans.

Since its 2006 inception, the 50 Million Tree Pledge has seen Enterprise partner with several Canadian provinces and partners to plant a total of 718,700 trees. To date, Enterprise has helped plant trees in British Columbia, Ontario, and Manitoba.

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Pike National Forest

Pike National Forest

Forest Overview

25,000 trees

Situated on three million acres in central and southeast Colorado, the Pike & San Isabel National Forests offer a diverse landscape — from short grass prairies to alpine tundra.

The Windy-Ridge Bristlecone Pine Scenic Area – a unique grove of beautiful and ancient Bristlecone Pine trees – is located in the Pike National Forest. More than 60 percent of the water used by Denver area residents originates in the forest as rain or snowmelt.

The Buffalo Creek Fire of 1996 burned 12,000 acres, while only six short years later the largest fire in Colorado's history, the Hayman Fire of 2002, burned an additional 137,000 acres. These fires had a devastating effect on the upper South Platte watershed, the primary water source for the City of Denver and surrounding communities. In moderate and high intensity burn areas, 100% of the trees were lost – and, along with them, future seed sources for natural regeneration.

The Spring 2014 Hayman/Buffalo Creek planting project includes both the South Park and South Platte Ranger districts of Pike National Forest. 2014 is the third year that Enterprise has contributed to make a positive difference to the restoration of this critical watershed and the wildlife habitat that it supports. Due to Enterprise's kind generosity and ongoing commitment, we are able to build upon the success of this important restoration project. Upon planting completion, Enterprise will have helped us to plant 224,800 total trees in central and southeast Colorado in critical support of the restoration of the Bristlecone Pine ecosystem.

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Gallatin National Forest

Gallatin National Forest

Forest Overview

100,000 trees

With its snow-covered mountain peaks and internationally known "blue ribbon" trout streams, the Gallatin National Forest is a popular recreation area in Montana's Northern Rockies. Often called, "The Gateway to Yellowstone," the forest's 1.8 million acres spans six mountain ranges and includes two designated Wilderness Areas in southwest Montana. Among the wildlife making their home in Gallatin are grizzly bears, gray wolves, Bald Eagles, and the Canada lynx.

Our 2014 project will focus on hand-planting conifer seedlings within areas affected by the Madison Arm Fire of 2007 and the Derby Fire of 2006. These two fires burned more than 200,000 acres of the forest floor and tree canopy, resulting in large areas of forest that will not regenerate on its own. Many of these burned areas serve as important buffers for critical Gallatin creeks and streams such as the Madison River and the Derby Creek. These watersheds are of vital importance to, and provide critical habitat for, many of the forest's wildlife, and also its fishery resources.

This once-vibrant watershed's restoration will help to ensure cleaner and more abundant water supplies for area communities. 2014 will mark the third year that Enterprise has partnered with us in Gallatin National Forest to help ensure forest and ecosystem recovery, the reestablishment of a future seed source, and critical habitat restoration. The successful conclusion of our 2014 tree planting will result in Enterprise having helped us to plant 314, 350 trees in Gallatin National Forest.

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Seminole State Forest

Seminole State Forest

Forest Overview

111,000 trees

Less than an hour drive from Orlando, Seminole State Forest is home to more than 25,000 acres of natural springs, creeks, bottomlands, swamps, sand hills, and beautiful pine woodlands. The forest boasts abundant beauty and a myriad of recreation opportunities. Adjacent to the Wekiva River Preserve State Park and Ocala National Forest, the Seminole State Forest plays a critical piece as part of the largest contiguous undeveloped landmass in central Florida.

Abundant sources of water, including Blackwater Creek, Lake Norris, and the Wekiva River, are central to diverse ecosystems within Seminole and support many different plant and animal species which thrive within the forest. Vital habitat is critical for several rare and threatened species such as the Florida black bear, scrub jay, gopher tortoise, and bald eagle. It’s a race against time to replant desperately needed longleaf pine trees before vital forest ecosystems are overrun by fire-prone brush.

In the winter of 2014, the Florida Division of Forestry will be preparing 189 acres and planting 111,000 longleaf pine trees —all made possible due to the generous support of Enterprise Rent A Car. This will mark the first time that Enterprise has helped us to plant trees in Seminole State Forest. These longleaf pine trees are an essential component in the ultimate recovery of the forest ecosystem of central Florida, as they will help to filter rain water, retain topsoil and moisture, provide diverse habitat and food sources for local wildlife, and help us preserve valuable, irreplaceable public lands in central Florida for generations to come.

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Modoc National Forest

Modoc National Forest

Forest Overview

100,000 trees

The Modoc National Forest spans two million acres of northern California and includes elevation changes from 4,300 feet to 10,000 feet above sea level. The forest is named for the county in which the greater part of the forest is situated, and the county is named after the native American Modoc tribe which battled at local lava beds from 1872-1873. These lava beds are now a national monument located within the boundaries of the National Forest.

In the summer of 2012, the Barry Point Fire burned 16,587 acres; most of the high severity burn occurred in the Devils Garden Ranger District. Unfortunately, the area is not benefitting from natural regeneration, necessitating the planting of ponderosa pine trees that will assist in the recovery of these scorched areas. Some of the direct and immediate benefits of this project include improved water quality and restored wildlife habitat in northern California.

In early spring 2014, contracted professional teams will work diligently to complete the task of planting more than 400,000 ponderosa pine trees. The more than 1,600-acre restoration project in the Modoc National Forest is an example of support that Enterprise is providing on federal lands in the state of California. To date, Enterprise has assisted in the planting of 1,876,500 total trees in California. Upon completion of the new 2014 proposals, we will exceed two million trees planted. The re-establishment of conifer species in all California fire zones will provide critical future seed source as well as sustainable habitat for animals that call California home.

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Huron-Manistee National Forest

Huron-Manistee National Forest

Forest Overview

215,000 trees

With thousands of lakes and miles of sparking rivers and streams, the Huron-Manistee National Forest epitomizes the splendid beauty of the Great Lakes region. Their combined 981,052 acres stretch across Michigan’s northern Lower Peninsula, from the Manistee’s 140-foot high wilderness dunes, through rolling hills and thick hardwood and pine forests of the Huron. These forests are known for their many bird species, including shorebirds, gulls, eagles, hawks, and loons.

The Au Saber River Valley is home to a rare Jack Pine ecosystem, important habitat for the endangered Kirtland’s Warbler, a rare songbird that nests in very few places on Earth, including just a few areas in Michigan. This small, colorful, and endangered bird nests on the ground under the living branches of small Jack Pine trees. A pair of these birds requires at least 8 acres of young Jack Pine forest to nest but usually needs 30 to 40 acres to raise a nest of young. Natural regeneration of the habitat, however, has not been successful.

Enterprise has assisted the work in Huron-Manistee in the past. In 2008 Enterprise made a large positive impact in the forest, having provided the funding for more than 400,000 trees. The completion of the endangered Kirtland’s Warbler planting of 2014 will help us to reach the milestone of a grand total of more than one million trees planted in the entire State of Michigan. The work that we are doing together to provide critical habitat for this rare songbird is beginning to pay dividends in the form of a greater number of males being counted in this unique forest habitat. In the 1950s, the male counts were slightly more than 400. In 2012, we experienced counts of more than 2,000 male Kirtland’s Warblers, a robust five-fold increase.

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Germany (Schutzgemeinschaft Deutscher Wald)

Germany (Schutzgemeinschaft Deutscher Wald)

Forest Overview

10,000

SDW is a non-profit organization dedicated to preserving the beauty, health, and sustainability of Germany’s forested lands. SDW was founded in 1952 in conjunction with the celebration of Germany’s first official Arbor Day. The goal of SDW is to improve the relationship between people and the forest, which is increasingly important for the young people who are alienated from the natural environment. Translated, SDW stands for the German Forest Protection Association.

The site chosen for an April 2014 planting is in Saxony near the village of Barenwalde. The 10,000 newly planted Douglasfir, mountain ash, larch, alder, and oak trees will promote the characteristic forest ecosystems commonly found in this region. The overall project will cover more than 6.5 acres and will provide accelerated soil stabilization, flood prevention, wildlife habitat, and local aesthetics.

SDW proposes that Enterprise employees have the opportunity to participate in these planting efforts. The closest Enterprise office is in Zwickau, Saxony which is approximately 15 miles away from the planting site. This will be the second time that Enterprise has worked in Germany since the inception of the 50 Million Tree Pledge, bringing the total trees planted in Germany to 60,000.

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