2014 Restoration Projects

Bastrop State Park | Ausable River Watershed and University of British Columbia | Flight 93 National Memorial | Ministry of Defense Estate | Swan Lake First Nation Indian Reserve | Pike National Forest | Gallatin National Forest | Seminole State Forest | Modoc National Forest | Huron-Manistee National Forests | Saxony

Bastrop State Park

Bastrop State Park

Bastrop, Texas

On September 4, 2011, three separate wildfires in and around Bastrop, Texas, eventually merged into one fire—the Bastrop County Complex Fire. The fire quickly spread across the drought-ridden region, inflicting significant scars on the landscape of central Texas. By October 29, when the fire was finally declared extinguished, 95% of Bastrop State Park and 32,400 acres of the Lost Pines Forest ecosystem were burned.

2014 marks the second year of Enterprise’s partnership with Bastrop State Park in central Texas. 250,000 loblolly pine trees were planted to serve a critical role in helping to restore the forest and critical wildlife habitat lost in these devastating wildfires.

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Ontario (Trees Ontario)

Ausable River Watershed and University of British Columbia

Ontario and British Columbia (Trees Ontario)

In Ontario and British Columbia, five sites were selected in the Ausable River watershed and the University of British Columbia Malcolm Knapp Research Forest. Throughout the watershed, actual forest cover ranges from 6% to 15% in the project area. Establishing tree cover and connecting corridors is very important for local wildlife populations. And the research forest—used for training of future foresters—is in great need of restoration.

Each of the five sites had a different long-term goal, requiring a different suite of tree species to be planted. Throughout the months of March, April and May 2014, a total of 11,220 trees were planted to improve the quality of the watershed forests, the connectivity of corridors and skills training for students in the forestry program.

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Flight 93 Memorial

Flight 93 National Memorial

Shanksville, Pennsylvania

The Flight 93 National Memorial is a spectacularly moving, newly dedicated 2,200 acre National Park in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. This hallowed land is a permanent and lasting tribute to the forty men and women who lost their lives in order to save the lives of many others on September 11, 2001. The memorial is located on reclaimed coal mining land. Though historically forested, the reclaimed land now consists of compacted soils and thin tree stands due to the many years of intensive coal extraction.

Spring 2014—the second year of Enterprise Rent-A-Car’s involvement in this important project—featured a volunteer-led reforestation event that celebrated National Park Week and Arbor Day. Overall, 39,000 trees were planted.

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United Kingdom (Woodland Trust)

Ministry of Defense Estate

United Kingdom (Woodland Trust)

Despite the importance of trees and the widespread recognition of the benefits they provide, the United Kingdom is one of the least wooded countries in Europe with only 13% woodland cover compared with the European average of 44%. We are working to help increase the amount of native tree cover across the UK.

In 2014, the Woodland Trust planted 100,000 trees on behalf of the Arbor Day Foundation and Enterprise Rent-A-Car. The trees have been planted on the Ministry of Defense estate to improve both the military training facilities and enhance the biodiversity of the various sites. When possible, the Woodland Trust has involved both military and civilian personnel (including Enterprise’s staff) in tree planting events.

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Manitoba (Tree Canada)

Swan Lake First Nation Indian Reserve

Carberry, Manitoba (Tree Canada)

The Swan Lake First Nation Indian Reserve 7A is a section of First Nation land in south-central Manitoba that consisted primarily of hay, meadow and sparse tree cover. Many fragmented open areas were in need of additional tree cover and critical habitat restoration.

In the fall of 2014, Tree Canada partnered with the Arbor Day Foundation and Enterprise Rent a Car to facilitate the planting of 38,780 white spruce trees (Manitoba's provincial tree) on a 52-hectare parcel within the Swan Lake First Nation Indian Reserve 7A. The trees provide many benefits including snow retention, shelter from winds, recreational opportunities, wildlife corridor restoration, enhanced aesthetic beauty, and critical watershed protection.

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Pike National Forest

Pike National Forest

Central Colorado

Pike National Forests is more than a tourist attraction—it is also home to the upper South Platte watershed, the primary water source for the City of Denver and surrounding communities. In 1996, the Buffalo Creek Fire burned 12,000 acres of the Pike National Forest. Only six years later, the largest fire in Colorado's history (the Hayman Fire of 2002) burned an additional 137,000 acres. These fires had a devastating effect on the upper South Platte watershed. In moderate and high intensity burn areas, 100% of the trees were lost—and along with them, future seed sources for natural regeneration.

Over the course of a 3 week period in the spring of 2014, a total of 25,000 trees were planted across more than 1,300 acres of the national forest. This planting will help to regenerate the forest and rebuild the watershed relied on by so many for clean water.

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Gallatin National Forest

Gallatin National Forest

South-Central Montana

The stunning 1.8 million acre Gallatin National Forest is a vital component of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, as it is the largest intact ecosystem in the continental U.S. But insects, disease and wildfire have all taken their toll on the pristine forestland in Gallatin.

2014 restoration efforts focused on the more than 210,000-acre area severely burned by the Madison Arm Fire and the Derby Fire. In June, after large amounts of spring moisture, 100,000 trees were planted to help regeneration of a forest that is home to many different animals including grizzly bears, gray wolves, bald eagles, and the Canada lynx.

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Seminole State Forest

Seminole State Forest

Orlando, Florida

Less than an hour's drive from Orlando, Seminole State Forest is home to more than 25,000 acres of natural springs, creeks, bottomlands, swamps, sand hills, and beautiful pine woodlands. But in May of 2007, an intense wildfire burned approximately 2,200 acres of the forest—severely damaging both mature and immature pines.

In the winter of 2013/2014, crews worked to replant 111,000 longleaf pine trees on approximately 300 acres of land. These trees are essential to the landscape and its recovery: to retain topsoil and moisture, filter rain water and provide diverse habitat and food sources for local wildlife—including threatened species such as the Florida black bear, scrub jay, gopher tortoise and bald eagle.

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Modoc National Forest

Modoc National Forest

Northern California

The Modoc National Forest spans two million acres of northern California. In the summer of 2012, the Barry Point Fire burned 16,587 acres; most of the high-severity burn occurred in the Devils Garden Ranger District. Unfortunately, the area was not benefitting from natural regeneration, necessitating the planting of ponderosa pine trees to assist in the recovery of these scorched areas.

Planting began on April 7, and by April 25, a total of 100,000 ponderosa pines were planted in the Devils Garden Ranger District. The direct benefits of this planting project include improved water quality and restored wildlife habitat in northern California.

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Huron-Manistee National Forest

Huron-Manistee National Forests

Northern Lower Peninsula of Michigan

With thousands of lakes and miles of sparkling rivers and streams, the Huron-Manistee National Forest epitomizes the splendid beauty of the Great Lakes region. It is also home to a rare Jack Pine ecosystem that serves as important habitat for the endangered Kirtland’s Warbler, a rare songbird that nests in very few places on Earth. Unfortunately, natural regeneration of this crucial habitat has not been successful.

To keep the ecosystem healthy, 215,000 jack pine trees were planted across 391 acres in May of 2014. This concerted effort will help to ensure a future for the Kirtland’s Warbler.

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Germany (Schutzgemeinschaft Deutscher Wald)

Saxony

Germany (Schutzgemeinschaft Deutscher Wald)

Planting efforts near the village of Barenwalde were made possible with the help of Schutzgemeinschaft Deutscher Wald, a nonprofit organization dedicated to preserving the beauty, health and sustainability of Germany’s forested lands. The area was in need of watershed protection and improved wildlife habitat.

In March and April, 10,000 oak, wych elm, common alder, douglasfir, European larch, European mountainash, spindle tree, mayblossom, cramp bark and hazelnut trees were planted to promote the characteristic forest ecosystems commonly found in this region. The overall project covers more than 6.5 acres and will provide accelerated soil stabilization and flood prevention while enhancing wildlife habitat and local aesthetics.

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