2011 Restoration Projects

Fremont-Winema National Forest | Gallatin National Forest | Manitoba, Canada

Fremont-Winema National Forest

burnout opperation Fremont-Winema National Forest
Structure Protection Burnout Operation AttributionShare AlikeFremont-Winema National Forest

Forest Overview

50,000 trees | Located in southern Oregon

Fremont-Winema National Forest is bordered by the Cascade Mountain Range and Crater Lake National Park on the west and the Klamath River Basin on the east. The forest is filled with extensive stands of ponderosa and lodgepole pine that grow throughout the 2.3 million acre forest in Southern Oregon.

Need for Trees

The 2011 planting project is the first step in rehabilitating a 300,000-acre area which has been devastated by the mountain pine beetle epidemic. More than ninety percent of the pine trees that had previously dominated this area have been lost to this destructive insect. Due to the heavy loss of mature pine, most of the seed source for future natural regeneration in the area has also been lost.

Impact

The forest plays a major role in clean water release to many bodies of water. The Klamath River basin, Upper Klamath Lake, and the Williamson River are just a few examples of critical water bodies that depend on healthy trees to filter and release snowpack and rainfall throughout the year. In May of 2011, the U.S. Forest Service will begin the recovery process by planting thousands of insect resistant ponderosa pine trees. These trees will ensure a future stand of resilient pine forest in an ecologically diverse area of the United States.

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Gallatin National Forest

mountain view of Gallatin National Forest
Daisy Pass, Gallatin National Forest AttributionForest Service - Northern Region

Forest Overview

200,000 trees | Located in Montana's Northern Rockies

With its snow-covered mountain peaks and internationally known “blue ribbon” trout streams, the Gallatin National Forest is a popular recreation area in Montana’s Northern Rockies. Often called “The Gateway to Yellowstone,” the forest’s 1.8 million acres span six mountain ranges and includes two designated wilderness areas in southwest Montana. Among the wildlife making their home in Gallatin are grizzly bears, gray wolves, bald eagles, and the Canada lynx.

Need for Trees

The Derby Fire of 2006 and Wicked Fire of 2007 burned more than 250,000 acres. The flames burned the forest floor and tree canopy, causing large areas of forest that will not regenerate on its own. Many of these burned areas are buffers for Gallatin creeks and streams, which in turn, affect many of the forest’s wildlife, fisheries, and water supplies for the area’s communities.

Impact

Our friends at Gallatin National Forest have been working with the Arbor Day Foundation and its partners for more than 20 years to bring the forest back to health. In June of 2011, planting of Douglasfir and Engelmann spruce will commence. These trees will aid in the multi-year re-establishment of a beautiful and wondrous landscape shared by all who love the outdoors.

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Manitoba, Canada

fire damaged trees in spruce forest
Burned Spruce Forest, Manitoba, Canada AttributionNoncommercialNo Derivative Works Phil Camill

Forest Overview

77,700 trees trees | Located in southwestern California

Tree Canada, in partnership with Enterprise Rent-A-Car, the Arbor Day Foundation, and Manitoba Forestry Association, proposes to plant 77,700 white spruce trees on two sites in Manitoba. The trees will be planted on publicly-owned, haymeadow land surrounding the rural municipality of St. Andrews and five parcels of reclamation land in Lac du Bonnet. These two locations are highly visible areas with excellent potential.

Need for Trees

White spruce seedlings will be grown at the local Pineland Forest Nursery in Manitoba and planted on this publicly-owned, municipal land. First Nations tree planting crews from the northern community of Fort Alexander will plant the white spruce seedlings during the fall of 2011. The trees to be planted on both sites will provide multiple benefits including site screening, shelter, shade, noise and dust reduction, snow retention, habitat and food for wildlife, aesthetic beauty, watershed protection, and clean air for all Manitobans.

Impact

Lac du Bonnet offers waterways, Boreal Forests and granite hills to residents and tourists. The municipality lies on the western banks of the Winnipeg River and is within 100 km of Manitoba’s capital city of Winnipeg. St. Andrews is just minutes away from Winnipeg and is located off the banks of the Red River. The area plays akey role in protecting the larger Red River Basin watershed.

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