2007 Restoration Projects

Lassen National Forest | Custer National Forest | Sequoia National Forest | San Bernardino National Forest | Wallowa–Whitman National Forest | Scotland: Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park | Bitterroot National Forest | Gallatin National Forest

Lassen National Forest: Post-Fire Reforestation

Deer Creek with autumn trees in Lassen National Forest
Lassen National Forest, Deer Creek AttributionNoncommercialdlnwelch

Forest Overview

1.3 million acres | South-central and southeastern Montana, northwestern South Dakota

1.2 million acres | Located in northern California

The Lassen National Forest lies at the heart of one of the most breathtaking areas of California, called the Crossroads. Here the granite of the Sierra Nevada, the lava of the Cascades and the Modoc Plateau, and the sagebrush of the Great Basin meet and blend. The forest offers great variety of recreational opportunities to visitors. Among them is spectacular wildlife viewing of elk, osprey, bald eagles, deer, sandhill cranes, and badgers.

Need for Trees

The forest has experienced several large wildfires in recent years that have created a backlog of reforestation needs. One such fire was the Straylor Fire, which burned 3,422 acres in an area where the forest structure emphasis is on range and wildlife needs. An arid environment hinders natural regeneration of the site, and replanting is necessary to help reestablish healthy stands.

Planting and Impact

For this project, 240,000 Ponderosa and Jeffrey Pine will be planted in May of 2007. The project will help these species regenerate before shrubs and grasses take over the damaged site. Reforestation in the burned area will help restore the pine forest ecosystem, creating wildlife habitat and improving visual appeal in the forest.

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Custer National Forest: Post-Fire Reforestation

mountain view of Custer National Forest
Custer National Forest AttributionNoncommercialNo Derivative Worksjshyun

Forest Overview

1.3 million acres | South-central and southeastern Montana, northwestern South Dakota

The Custer National Forest is the most ecologically diverse forest in the Northern Region, reaching from the Absaroka-Beartooth Wilderness near Red Lodge, Montana to the grasslands of South Dakota. 345,599 acres of the forest are designated Wilderness Areas. This forest is well known for lake and stream fishing and provides habitat for mountain goats, big horn sheep, elk, mule and white-tail deer, black bear, cougar, and moose.

Need for Trees

The Kraft Springs Fire burned 65,551 acres, with 70% of the acreage being a re-burn of the previous Brewer Fire, which damaged 58,000 acres. More than half of the landscape in this fire experienced a high intensity burn. As a result of these wildfires, forested habitat has been reduced by 69% on this landscape. Additional fires in recent years have added to the need for replanting projects in this forest.

Planting and Impact

This project will plant 257,650 Ponderosa Pine seedlings in 2007. This reforestation project will help speed recovery of the forested habitat that would otherwise take many decades.

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Sequoia National Forest: Post-Fire Reforestation

mountain view of Gallatin National Forest
Sequoia National Forest, Crescent Meadow AttributionNoncommercialShare AlikeJerry Ting

Forest Overview

864,991 acres | Located in central California

Situated northeast of Bakersfield and east of Fresno, the Sequoia National Forest is named for the giant sequoia, the world's largest tree. The forest encompasses 38 groves of giant sequoia. Majestic granite monoliths, glacier-torn canyons, roaring whitewater, and lush meadows characterize the landscape at the Sierra Nevadas southern end. Elevations range from 1,000 feet in the foothill region to peaks over 12,000 feet in the rugged high country, providing millions of visitors each year with some of the most spectacular views of mountainous landscape in the entire west. Deer, bear, and many birds, such as the California spotted owl and northern goshawk, live in the forest, along with 19 threatened and endangered species and 44 sensitive animal species—including the California golden trout, the state fish.

Need for Trees

Recently, the Sequoia National Forest experienced the largest wildfire in its history. The McNally Fire burned over 150,000 acres, through oak woodland and Sierra Nevada forest and into the ponderosa pine and mixed conifer forests along the upslope. Combined with the damaging effects of the Manter Fire just two years earlier, this fire has created an even greater need for replanting to impede competing vegetation and restore fragmented wildlife habitats.

Planting and Impact

This reforestation project will plant 28,000 Jeffrey Pine and White Fir in June of 2007. The trees will help prevent soil erosion and improve the condition of the area's watershed while restoring critical wildlife habitat.

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San Bernardino National Forest: Post-Fire Reforestation

forest fire damage in San Bernardino National Forest
2003 Forest Fire, San Bernardino National Forest AttributionNo Derivative Workstonyhall

Forest Overview

672,000 acres | Located in southwestern California

The San Bernardino National Forest receives more visitors than either Yellowstone or Yosemite national parks. Outdoor enthusiasts can explore the over 500 miles of trails found in the forest. This unique forest offers a diverse climate where a cactus can be found with snow capped mountains in the distance. Big Bear Lake is a popular recreational stop for visitors. Two endangered species call this forest home, the mountain yellow–legged frog and the peninsular bighorn sheep.

Need for Trees

The planting area was severely burned by a two recent wildfires. The Old Fire and Grand Prix Fire burned over 90,000 acres in 2003. These fires burned so intense that nothing was left and there is no hope for natural regeneration to begin on its own. The area will be planted mostly with Jeffrey pine and some Sugar pine. Jeffrey Pine is native to the west coast, thrives in comparatively harsh environments, is tolerant of drought and competes well and typically dominates other conifers on cold, xeric, and infertile sites.

Planting and Impact

For this project, 150,000 pines will be planted on 500 acres in March 2007. This planting project will restore vegetation patterns on the landscape to provide habitat for a variety of wildlife species as well as reducing the brush competition.

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Wallowa-Whitman National Forest:
Post-Fire Reforestation

mountain view of Wallowa-Whitman National Forest
Wallowa-Whitman National Forest AttributionNoncommercialNo Derivative WorksDB's travels

Forest Overview

2.4 million acres | Located in northeastern Oregon and western Idaho

The Wallowa-Whitman National Forest includes many landscapes, from alpine meadows and desert-like environments, to lakes, rustic homesteads and old mining sites. The Hells Canyon All-American Road Scenic Byway is a five-hour scenic tour that provides a beautiful view of the canyon country at the Hells Canyon Overlook. Over 350 species of wildlife can be found in the Forest, including mule deer, Rocky Mountain Bighorn sheep, elk, mountain goats, cougars, and bald eagle. Recreation includes skiing, fishing and swimming in the Forest's many lakes, rivers, streams and reservoirs, and backpacking on over 2,000 miles of varied hiking trails.

Need for Trees

The Monument Fire burned approximately 4,100 acres in the forest, with approximately 80% of the burned area experiencing high to moderate fire severity across the forested uplands and the streamside and riparian wetlands. Natural regeneration of the native species of ponderosa pine and western larch will take decades, with some areas never reforesting due to the high levels of tree mortality and lack of seed source.

Planting and Impact

This reforestation project will plant 100,000 ponderosa pine and western larch in April of 2007. The planting will help restore the forests native vegetation and speed up development of habitat for wildlife species that depend on old-growth forest. The planting will also restore streamside and riparian wetlands, improving stream bank stability to benefit fish and wildlife habitat, water quality, and aesthetic appeal.

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Scotland: Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park: Development

Loch Lomond National Park trees
Loch Lomond National Park AttributionNo Derivative WorksMischaTuffield

Forest Overview

Located in central Scotland 720 sq. miles (1,865 sq. km)

The Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park boast some of the finest scenery in Scotland. This magnificent landscape embraces the deep waters of Loch Lomond, the wild glens of the Trossachs, Breadalbane’s high mountains and the sheltered sea lochs of the Argyll Forest. Close to Glasgow and Edinburgh, the area is full of contrasts, from rolling lowland landscapes in the south to high mountains in the north, and has many lochs and rivers, forests and woodlands. This living, working landscape is visited and enjoyed by hundreds of thousands of visitors annually for its recreational value. More than 70% of Scotland's population lives less than an hour's travel time from Loch Lomond and The Trossachs.

Need for Trees

This area is the site of a new woodland development that will be planted with approximately 1 million trees over the next decade. The location presents a prime opportunity to develop habitat for Scotlands native red squirrel, which is under threat from the non-native grey squirrel that carries a squirrel pox virus fatal to red squirrels. The planting will also help protect Loch Katrine, which provides Glasgows water supply through a series of tunnels and aqueducts in its unique Victorian infrastructure.

Planting and Impact

Planting will take place in 2007. The park will plant 40,000 trees to include Caledonian Scots Pine, Sessile oak, Alder, Ash, Silver Birch, and will supplement the planting with species such as Aspen and Juniper. The planting site will form part of the Wider Forest Habitat Network, providing a corridor for flora and fauna stretching from Loch Lomond to the town of Callander. The project will also provide and maintain habitat for the resident Red Deer population and Black Grouse, as well as eagles and other wildlife that inhabit the area.

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Bitterroot National Forest:
Post-Fire Reforestation

workers clearing trees in Bitterroot National Forest
Trail Clearing, Bitterroot National Forest AttributionForest Service - Northern Region

Forest Overview

1.6 million acres | Located in west central Montana and east central Idaho

Stretching between two mountain ranges in Montana and Idaho, the Bitterroot National Forest boasts the largest expanse—743,000 acres—of continuous pristine wilderness in the lower 48 states. Mountainous terrain and deep, glaciated canyons are graced with stands of Douglas-fir, lodgepole pine and western larch, with Engelmann spruce, subalpine fir, subalpine larch and whitebark pine at higher elevations. Deer, mountain lions, moose, and black bear are among the many species that make the Bitterroot their home.

Need for Trees

Firestorms in 2000 severely burned more than 370,000 acres (23% of the forest). Many of the fires burned so intensely that minimal vegetation remained in the damaged areas, leaving little hope for natural regeneration to begin on its own. Ponderosa pine, Douglas-fir, lodgepole pine, and Engelmann spruce will be planted to help stabilize soil, protect critical watersheds and wildlife habitat, reduce the spread of weeds, and re-establish magnificent, large pine stands in the Bitterroot Valley.

Planting and Impact

For this project, 130,000 pines will be planted on 500 acres in March 2007. This planting project will restore vegetation patterns on the landscape to provide habitat for a variety of wildlife species as well as reducing the brush competition.

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Gallatin National Forest: Post-Fire Reforestation

Mountain view of Gallatin National Forest
Daisy Pass, Gallatin National Forest AttributionForest Service - Northern Region

Forest Overview

1.8 million acres | Located in south-central Montana

With its snow-covered mountain peaks and internationally known “blue ribbon” trout streams, the Gallatin National Forest is a popular recreation area in Montana's Northern Rockies. Part of the Greater Yellowstone Area, the forest spans six mountain ranges and includes two designated Wilderness Areas in southwest Montana. Among the wildlife making their homes in Gallatin are grizzly bears, gray wolf, Bald Eagles, and the Canada lynx.

Need for Trees

During the summer of 2006, the massive Derby Fire in 2006 burned more than 247,000 acres of Gallatin National Forest, leaving no trees as seed sources for natural regeneration in many areas. Without replanting, these areas will not regenerate for many decades, leaving many species of wildlife without sufficient habitat and marring the beauty of this majestic forest. Selected areas will be planted mostly with Ponderosa pine, Douglas-fir, and lodgepole pine to help restore the forest while stabilizing soil, protecting critical watersheds, and recreating vital wildlife habitat.

Planting and Impact

For this project, 14,350 pines will be planted in June of 2007. This planting project will restore damage done by the Derby Fire and other recent wildfires.

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