America's Favorite Cherry Tree

Vote for Your Favorite

Autumn Flowering Cherry

The Autumn Flowering cherry is one of 12 original varieties in the Tidal Basin that was included in the 1912 gift from the mayor of Tokyo. This unique cherry tree is known for producing lovely pink buds and white flowers off and on during a warm autumn season, and fully flowering in the spring...more

Yoshino Cherry

The Yoshino cherry tree is the most abundant tree in the Tidal Basin. The tree originally arrived from Japan in 1902, but gained its fame and notoriety once it was planted in Washington, DC as part of the 1912 gift. The Yoshino's exact parents and origin are unknown, but it is believed...more

Kwanzan (Kanzan) Cherry

The Kwanzan cherry tree is native to China, Japan, and Korea. Introduced to America in 1903, it became famous due to its glorious floral displays during the annual Festival in Washington, DC. Primarily growing in East Potomac Park, the Kwanzan cherry trees come into...more

Autumn Flowering Cherry

The Autumn Flowering cherry is one of 12 original varieties in the Tidal Basin that was included in the 1912 gift from the mayor of Tokyo. This unique cherry tree is known for producing lovely pink buds and white flowers off and on during a warm autumn season, and fully flowering in the spring. The tree is a landscaping favorite across the United States. About 20 Autumn Flowering cherry trees remain in the Tidal Basin today, with most congregated on south side near the Thomas Jefferson.

Bloom: Showy, 3/4" semi-double, 10 petal flowers go through a multitude of color changes during the blooming period. Beginning with a deep pink bud, turning to light pink when open and fading to almost white when fully open.

Bloom Time: Last bloom of the spring season during the National Cherry Blossom Festival. Blooms again in autumn.

Other Ornamental Qualities: Vibrant fall foliage turns bronze, yellow, gold, or deep-red tinged. The tree also produces pea-sized black berries for wildlife, and an attractive bark during winter.

Interesting Facts: Its long lifespan endures is more cold, heat and stress better than other ornamental cherry trees.

Location in Tidal Basin: View a map of Autumn Flowering cherry trees in the area.

Yoshino Cherry

The Yoshino cherry tree is the most abundant tree in the Tidal Basin. The tree originally arrived from Japan in 1902, but gained its fame and notoriety once it was planted in Washington, DC as part of the 1912 gift. The Yoshino's exact parents and origin are unknown, but it is believed to be a cross of multiple species.

Bloom: Blossoms usually emerge before the leaves, providing a stunning show of pink or white flowers ranging in size from 3/4 inch to 1 Ā½ inches to diameter. The blossoms are slightly fragrant flowers and often appear in clusters of four or more.

Bloom Time: March to April. Check back to track the anticipated peak blooming period during the National Cherry Blossom Festival's Centennial Celebration.

Other Ornamental Qualities: Leaves of the Yoshino often emerge reddish before turning dark green. The showy yellow fall color of the leaves gives way to attractive reddish-brown bark with prominent, horizontal lenticels.

Interesting Facts: Macon, Georgia, is home to 300,000 Yoshinos and has an annual Cherry Blossom Festival celebrating their bloom.

Location in Tidal Basin: View a map of Yoshino cherry trees in the area.

Kwanzan (Kanzan) Cherry

The Kwanzan cherry tree is native to China, Japan, and Korea. Introduced to America in 1903, it became famous due to its glorious floral displays during the annual Festival in Washington, DC. Primarily growing in East Potomac Park, the Kwanzan cherry trees come into bloom two weeks later than the Yoshino cherry trees.

Bloom: Deep colored double pink blossoms with 30 petals each. The large 2 1/2" diameter flowers grow in hanging clusters of three to five. Leaves can emerge during bloom time creating a unique contrast of green leaves and pink flowers.

Bloom Time: April, generally two weeks later than Yoshino.

Other Ornamental Qualities: The foliage of the Kwanzan cherry range from yellow, orange, and copper creating a spectacular fall display.

Interesting Facts: Named after a mountain in Japan, the original name is 'Sekiyama,' but it is rarely used.

Location in Tidal Basin: View a map of Kwanzan cherry trees in the area.

a collaborative campaign by: